Super Toy Cars Review

STC3 At least once in our lives we’ve played a Micro Machines game. My memories are those of the Micro Machines PS1 game which I spent hours playing with my two older brothers. Well, Super Toy Cars is sort of the same idea, wherein tracks are based on household settings, but none of the tracks have the same standard as those of the 1997 release.  One of the selling points of this game is that there are 16 ‘different’ cars to choose from, but to me there are no complex differences apart from “this one goes faster than that one”. Once you find the fastest car, there is no point of going back to change it seeing as you’re promised victory every time.

There is only one rule that you should abide by while playing Super Toy Cars: to not take the game seriously. That rule is the exact opposite of what I did in the when first playing this game. I found that the controls would be too complex for a little child (which I assume is the target audience) seeing as after playing this game for a long time, I still couldn’t figure out how to use the drift function correctly. But after I stopped shouting swear words and came to terms with the fact that this is a silly kid’s game, I was able to have a modicum of fun.

I got most of my enjoyment by playing with my brothers and seeing how broken the game is. I remember crashing into an invisibleSTC2 wall in the middle of a race which set me back 5 places, though at the time I didn’t find it so funny. Another glitch I found in the game was that in Editor Mode when testing your track, you could just drive straight through walls and fall into nothingness. The music throughout this game sounds like it was produced by two teens in their dad’s garage, and they were only allowed to practice an hour a day due to noise complaints from neighbours.

Although I say all these things this game isn’t too bad and certainly not Ride to Hell standard, as there are some good aspects of Super Toy Cars. For example, I liked how there’s a cool selection of special paint jobs for certain cars, which consisted of bodies like a Hippie van or a Police car (which is my personal favourite). Some of the tracks were actually quite fun, in the sense that there are cool jumps and ramps within them. The local multiplayer is enjoyable as, even though the game may lack in quality, there is still an intense competition for first place (a competition that I would never win). One thing that I found amusing is that the game deliberately included a respawn button, as the developers must have known that you can get easily stuck on things. The game also looked very nice, with the track scenery being very colourful.

STC4However, the disappointing fact overall is that this game felt unfinished. There is no ability to shoot weapons like rockets or snooker balls backwards, which would be incredibly handy when in first place (and tends to be an obvious inclusion in most racing games). There is also no ability to use motion controls, while using the gamepad or any other controller. And if you do choose to switch to the Wii remote you have to hold it vertically, which wasn’t too bad once you got used to it. But it took away the sense of making you feel like you’re driving the car, which is the main aim of racing games in my opinion.

I’m going to have to give Super Toy Cars 4 out of 10 as though it did severely lack in terms of overall gameplay, it made up for it in the fun you get when play with friends. It’s just so hard to release a racing game with Mario Kart 8 already dominating the genre for Wii U; Super Toy Cars just seems like a cheap alternative. You can tell the there is a lot of effort put into this game, just not enough to reach the usual standard of non-realistic racing games.

Score: 4/10 – Poor

REVIEW CODE: true staff A complimentary code was to Brash Games for this review. send review links true. For all review code enquiries, please use the contact form.

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