Seraph Review

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Earlier in the year, I reviewed a game called Ironcast, made by the developers Dreadbit. I gave the game a 7/10 score, so I would say I am pretty content with Dreadbit and if they made another game, I would happily play and review it. Enter Seraph.

Seraph strangely reminds me of Bayonetta. There is something about the play style, where Bayonetta is much more dynamic, Seraph has a certain way about them. I say them, because while Seraph possesses a human female vessel, the angel themselves are gender-less. You, the angel, are trying to escape a prison you have been held in for thirty years, but daemons are doing all they can to stop you from escaping. No one is coming to help you, so it is completely up to you to get yourself out of there alive. However, back to my point on Bayonetta, I think it may be because both Seraph and Bayonetta move freely and feel light to play. In Seraph, the game auto aims for you, all you have to do is shoot and evade. That may sound like a lame challenge, but Seraph makes up for it in terms of difficulty. Even in the tutorial where you cannot die, I was doing a heck of a lot more evading than killing. Once I entered the real game, I was doing everything in my power to not die, and yet, die I did. Many times.

Seraph is a clean and responsive platformer, with controls that I personally found easy to play with. Obviously, it can be a different story when you are feeling flustered, which I felt a lot while I was playing, but generally, I felt like I knew exactly what I was doing. The game even displays your skills at the bottom of the screen, including their cool down time, if they are ready to be used and what buttons you need to press to activate them. In that sense, the game is fast paced, in the way that Overwatch is. In Overwatch, you are doing PvP, but in Seraph, it is PvE.

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The difficulty rises steadily, and the game always displays the difficulty you are currently playing at, in the bottom left hand side of the screen. I started on standard difficulty, and thank the heavens I did, because I was struggling from the beginning. If you finish the game on veteran difficulty, please let me know so I can bow down. If you are a trophy hunter, Seraph game has a great variety of trophies to reward you with for working hard, including one platinum and six gold. But be prepared to work for it – none of the trophies come easy. To aid you in your quest for trophies, the game allows you to upgrade and craft weapons and skills, but your default is Seraph’s dual pistols with unlimited ammo.

Another feature worth mentioning is the fact that all levels are randomly generated, including the contents within. Each session you play will be different from the last, so even if you finish the game and go back for round two on a higher difficulty, there basically will not be any walkthroughs to help you out. Considering each level is designed so you have to climb walls and fall down them, dash across the screen and over the heads of enemies and do this all while staying alive, the game is definitely worth buying if you are looking for a game with longevity.

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If you are a streamer looking for a challenge, then Seraph definitely has it for you. There is a mode of this game specifically designed for streamers, allowing viewers to vote on whether the streamer has a positive or negative modifier in the next level. It is a great way for your viewers to get involved, and either watching to struggle or prevail with ease is something they can say they helped you with, which I think is pretty cool.

All in all, I think this game is great. It is definitely one I want to do well in the market, because I think it has all the key components for a good game. Interesting play style, good story, longevity and a wide variety of features to cater the game to you. If you are looking for a new game worth your time and money, look no further. Seraph is waiting for you.

Rating 9

REVIEW CODE: A complimentary Sony Playstation 4 code was provided to Brash Games for this review. Please send all review code enquiries to editor@brashgames.co.uk.

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